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TITLEICAT: Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool

PROJECT CODE7-1G, 8-1G, 9-1G, 10-1G, 10-1V, 11-1G, 13-1G, 14-1G, 14B-1G, 15-1G, 15-1T, 16-1A, 16-1D, 17-1D, 18-1D

COMMITTEEPolicy and Strategic Planning

YEAR FUNDEDYear 18 - FY 2010, Year 17 - FY 2009, Year 16 - FY 2008, Year 15 - FY 2007, Year 14 - FY 2006, Year 13 - FY 2005, Year 12 - FY 2004, Year 10 - FY 2002, Year 9 - FY 2001, Year 8 - FY 2000, Year 7 - FY 1999

Year 7 Budget:$50,000
Year 8 Budget:$250,000
Year 9 Budget:$400,000
Year 10 Budget:$200,000 (10-1G) and $15,000 (10-1V)
Year 11 Budget:$250,000
Year 13 Budget:$250,000
Year 14 Budget:$320,000
Year 15 Budget:$100,000 (15-1G) and $35,000 (15-1T)
Year 16 Budget:$150,000 (16-1A) and $80,000 (16-1D)
Year 17 Budget:$150,000 (17-1A) and $100,000 (17-1D)
Year 18 Budget:$100,000

STATUSActive

DESCRIPTION
The Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool (ICAT) is an analysis and planning tool being developed under the sponsorship of the I-95 Corridor Coalition.The Coalition’s 16-State region, stretching from Maine to Florida, is a patchwork of information islands -- unconnected transportation planning networks, roadway and rail line data, and trip information.  Coalition member agencies cannot easily relate these information islands to each other to inform and coordinate multi-state transportation planning, investment, and operations planning.The Coalition is developing ICAT to ensure that its members can effectively analyze and provide for coordinated transportation services across the Coalition region. 

ICAT will be a GIS-based, multi-state transportation network that will cover the full 16-State Coalition region.  Roadway and traffic data will be linked to the network.  The ICAT network and data will be accessible to all Coalition member agencies.  They will be able to use the tool to paint a picture of transportation patterns across several states or the whole Coalition region, or to analyze trends and forecast future travel volumes.  We expect that ICAT will help our member agencies consider a broader analysis perspective and get the best value for their customers from the tax dollars that will be invested in the region’s transportation systems. The initial applications for ICAT will focus on:  bottleneck analysis, highway investment planning, and emergency/ evacuation planning.

The Coalition has funded individual projects to accomplish this project.  They include:

  • 7-1G/8-1G: Integrated System for Corridor Operations and Management (ISCOM)
  • 9-1G: ISCOM
  • 10-1G: Development of ICAT (Phase I)
  • 10-1V: ICAT Delivery System
  • 11-1G: ICAT Phase III
  • 13-1G: Complete Data Integration and Develop Trip Table
  • 14-1G: Trip Tables and Impact Economic Analysis Tool
  • 14B-1G: Build a Permanent Delivery System
  • 15-1G: Origin Destination Commodity Flow
  • 15-1T: Rail Network Feasibility Study
  • 16-1A: Archived Data Management System Design
  • 16-1D: Maintenance and Updating
  • 17-1D: Maintenance Support
  • 18-1D: Maintenance Support
  • 19-1D: Maintenance Support

CONTACTS

Procurement Agency: Maryland SHA
Project Contact (Interim): Karen Jehanian

TITLEICAT: Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool

PROJECT CODE7-1G, 8-1G, 9-1G, 10-1G, 10-1V, 11-1G, 13-1G, 14-1G, 14B-1G, 15-1G, 15-1T, 16-1A, 16-1D, 17-1D, 18-1D

PROJECT DATES
Project Start:  January 2000
Expected Completion: TBD

Year 7 Budget:$50,000
Year 8 Budget:$250,000
Year 9 Budget:$400,000
Year 10 Budget:$200,000 (10-1G) and $15,000 (10-1V)
Year 11 Budget:$250,000
Year 13 Budget:$250,000
Year 14 Budget:$320,000
Year 15 Budget:$100,000 (15-1G) and $35,000 (15-1T)
Year 16 Budget:$150,000 (16-1A) and $80,000 (16-1D)

Year 17 Budget:$150,000 (17-1A) and $100,000 (17-1D)
Year 18 Budget:$100,000
OBJECTIVES

The overall project objective is to develop a GIS-based, multi-state transportation network – linking roadway and traffic data – across the 16 state Coalition region. The project consists of a number of elements, all of which work toward the end product. Thru Year 16, the elements include the initial concept, network development, origin destination commodity flow, archived data management system, and maintenance & updating. 


SCOPE

Project Idea Forms:
Project 15-1G: View PDF file
Project 16-1A: View PDF file

Scope of Projects:
Project 7-1G/8-1G: View PDF file
Project 13-1G: View PDF file 
Project 14-1G (A): View PDF file 
Project 14-1G (B): View PDF file
Project 14-1G (C): View PDF file 
Project 14B-1G: View PDF file 
Project 15-1T: View PDF file 
Project 16-1D: View Word file
Project 17-1D: View Word file
Project 18-1D: View Word file


REPORTS
Report Name
Report
ICAT Project Status Report and FY2011 Plans (October 2010) View Acrobat icon
ISCOM Washington, DC Breakout Session View Acrobat icon
ISCOM New York Breakout Session View Acrobat icon
ISCOM Boston Breakout Session View Acrobat icon
ISCOM Report View Acrobat icon
WebCAT - Interactive GIS Site View Acrobat icon
DataCAT - Permanent Delivery System FTP Download Site View Acrobat icon
Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool Safety Analysis View Acrobat icon
Year 15 ICAT Status Presentation View Acrobat icon

END OF PROJECT SUMMARY

Project 7-1G and 8-1G: During early CY 2000, documents were prepared and reviewed that described and illustrated the systems concept, objectives, and benefits, and began to define a program of activities for accomplishing these. A project statement for the Coalition’s Year 8 program was prepared and reviewed. This was viewed as the first step of a multi-year program aimed at meeting the system objectives. After approval by the Coalition’s Steering and Executive Committees, a detailed scope of work was prepared for the Year 8 project activity and made available for review and commenting. During CY 2001, a project statement for the 2nd ISCOM project as part of the Coalition’s Year 9 program was prepared, reviewed, and eventually approved by the Steering and Executive Committees. The Year 9 activity includes several workshops throughout the Corridor at which prototype applications will be presented and used to focus discussion on development priorities.

Project 10-1G and 11-1G: With Year 10 and 11 funds, the Coalition began Phase I development of ICAT. The Coalition has obtained a GIS-based transportation network map (a base line-layer) for the 16-state region and developed a geographic linear referencing system (LRS) tool. The LRS tool makes it possible to accurately match transportation data from different sources to locations on the ICAT network map. The Coalition is working now to populate the ICAT network and database with available data on roadway characteristics, capacity, and operations from national, state, and local sources. Data for an initial 8-10 states will be processed this year with Year 12 Funds. The data for the remaining states will be processed early next year with Year 13 Funds.

Project 13-1G: With Year 13 funds, the Coalition completed Phase I development of ICAT. The Coalition has continued development of the GIS-based transportation network map (a base line-layer) for the 16-state region and geographic linear referencing system (LRS) tool. The LRS tool makes it possible to accurately match transportation data from different sources to locations on the ICAT network map. For example, information on the number of lanes from the Federal Highway Administration’s national Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) can be matched to the ICAT network as can information on traffic volumes from state DOT roadway data inventories. Safety, environmental, and land use data also can be mapped to the ICAT network when needed for multi-state planning. The Coalition is now continuing to populate the ICAT network and database with available data on roadway characteristics, capacity, and operations from national, state, and local sources. Data for 15 of the 16 I-95 Corridor member states have been processed with Year 11 and Year 13 Funds. The data for the remaining state, (Virginia) which was not available during this phase, will be processed in year 2007 year with Year 14 Funds.

Project 14B-1G: The initial scope of work for this project identified four tasks: (1) create a prototype web-based map display system; (2) create a user-friendly data download site; (3) develop a plan for updating the ICAT databases; and (4) examine alternative hosting strategies for the ICAT web server. The web-based map display system was developed using ESRI’s ArcGIS Server commercial GIS software, and is currently running on a server temporarily hosted at Cambridge Systematics. The ICAT ftp site is being revised and will be populated with updated state highway networks and Coalition-wide highway and rail networks, as they become available. A technical memo was prepared discussing alternative long-term hosting options for the ICAT web-based GIS server, and the estimated start-up and ongoing maintenance costs for hardware, software, and hosting services. During the course of this project, a decision was made to rebuild the ICAT highway by “stitching together” the current state highway networks developed by each of the coalition states. This approach would make it more attractive for individual State DOTs to use and contribute updates to ICAT. A prototype, state-based ICAT highway network was developed from existing state networks, together with a common template for attribute data, and procedures for incorporating updates to both the attributes and network geometry obtained from individual states. A plan for ongoing maintenance and updating of the ICAT databases and delivery system was prepared and submitted as an annual scope of work, beginning with year 16 project submissions.

Project 15-1T: The ICAT rail network was created by merging two public domain, national-level rail network databases – one maintained by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) that provides current information on railroad ownership, trackage rights, and abandoned track; and one maintained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that contains information on the number of tracks and signal system needed for capacity analyses. Both databases were originally created from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 1:100,000-scale digital line graph (DLG) data, which is less accurate than the data sources used for the ICAT highway network. However, the database is designed to enable partial replacement of the rail network on a state-by-state basis, incorporating more accurate geometry as it becomes available.

The two national-level rail networks were merged relatively easily, using the more complete FRA network as the base for network geometry, and integrating the ORNL attributes based on spatial proximity of the track segments (conflation). Discrepancies between the two networks were investigated as part of a quality control process for all states in the Coalition region.

Project 15-1G and 16-1D:The ICAT maintenance program was divided into four task areas:

  1. ICAT data acquisition, maintenance and enhancement – this task involved integration of state highway network databases into the ICAT highway network. This task consumed the majority of available resources in order to convert state data to a common ICAT template, perform quality control procedures, and connect the individual state networks into a consolidated, multi-state network.
  2. ICAT server operations and maintenance – the ICAT server is being hosted at Cambridge Systematics (CS) as a prototype development, prior to a final decision on a permanent host site. In order to improve overall system performance, several hosted applications, including ICAT were moved to a dedicated GIS server configuration.
  3. ICAT web-based software enhancements – the ICAT GIS server software was upgraded using recent advancements in GIS server technology to provide improved performance, multiple background imagery, and simplified programming for adding new feature layers and functionality.
  4. Technical support for ICAT users – As part of this project, ICAT staff explored a partnership with the All Hazards Consortium to host a regional evacuation planning application on using the ICAT web site.

Project 17-1D: The ICAT maintenance program was divided into four task areas:

  • Continue development and updating of the ICAT highway network – this task continued integration of state highway network databases into the ICAT highway network, as well as enhancements such as adding traffic message channel (TMC) codes to major links to facilitate the display of archived traffic data, and network connectivity checks on higher functional class routes with the state networks to enable use of the database for network routing and assignment.
  • WebCAT Enhancements – the ICAT GIS server and map display system was enhanced with the development of an on-line WebCAT user’s guide, improvements in the map display performance, addition of new thematic maps and user functions to the map display, and additional geographic features.
  • Technical support for ICAT users – ICAT project staff provide both telephone and email technical assistance to WebCAT and DataCAT users throughout the year.
  • ICAT hosting services – the WebCAT and DataCAT sites continue to be hosted at Cambridge Systematics (CS) as a prototype development, prior to a final decision on a permanent host site.

ACTIONS

7-1G/8-1G: As a result of the work under this activity, the ideas first discussed during the Fall, 1999 Leadership Workshop were formed into a coherent system concept, and the first two steps towards achieving the system concept (the Year 8 and 9 projects scopes of work) were defined. Coalition leadership (primarily through the Program Management Committee) participated throughout the process, serving to steer system and project definitions towards a product that will serve the needs of the Coalition and its member agencies.

10-1G: Work will continue on this initiative with the next two phases of the project. Project Code: 11-1G

13-1G: Work will continue on this initiative with the next phases of the project.

14B-1G:The web-based GIS server was relatively easy to build using basic tools available within the commercial GIS software package. However, the operational performance of the prototype system (i.e., response time to queries, display refresh rates) was severely hampered by the limitations imposed by the host hardware and available communications bandwidth. In order to achieve acceptable levels of performance, the ICAT web-based GIS server should be hosted on a dedicated server with sufficient Internet bandwidth to accommodate the large amount of data being transferred.

Development of an ICAT highway network based on individual state highway network databases has proved to be more difficult and time consuming than initially anticipated. A significant amount of ‘front end” database design and software tool development was needed in order to facilitate future updates to attribute data, and to provide links to both state and national highway databases. These efforts should substantially reduce the costs and level of effort to update and enhance the ICAT highway network with new data received from the states.

15-1T: Creation of the ICAT rail database proved much easier than initially anticipated. The two national rail network databases were quite similar in terms of spatial representation and level of detail, which greatly facilitated the spatial integration process, and reduced the number of discrepancies to a manageable level of effort.

Although less geographically accurate than the ICAT highway network, the ICAT rail network can be displayed in conjunction with the ICAT highway at all but the largest scales (i.e., most “zoomed in”).

Future enhancements to the rail network may include more detailed and spatially accurate feature representation, as well as updated attribute data acquired from other Coalition projects (e.g., MAROPS).

15-1G:  Work continued on processing state highway networks for inclusion into the ICAT network.  Each of the state networks required significant clean-up to make them suitable for network analysis and modeling purposes.  Development of the ICAT web-based GIS was aided significantly by existing GIS software tools, which allowed us to create a basic operational system at relatively low cost.  Moreover, since this same software is being used in several other projects, we have been able to incorporate additional functionality that has been developed for these other projects.

16-1D: Development of an ICAT highway network based on individual state highway network databases has proved to be more difficult and time consuming than initially anticipated. A significant amount of ‘front end” database design and software tool development was needed in order to facilitate future updates to attribute data, and to provide links to both state and national highway databases. Additionally, most of the state networks required significant clean-up to handle network connectivity, and to transfer attribute data on divided highways from inventory routes to non-inventory directions. These efforts should substantially reduce the costs and level of effort to update and enhance the ICAT highway network with new data received from the states.

The processing of state highway data exhausted available funds, resulting in an early termination for this project. Work is being continued under a new project number.

Project 17-1D: Development of an ICAT highway network based on individual state highway network databases has proved to be more difficult and time consuming than initially anticipated. A significant amount of ‘front end” database design and software tool development was needed in order to facilitate future updates to attribute data, and to provide links to both state and national highway databases. Additionally, most of the state networks required significant clean-up to handle network connectivity, and to transfer attribute data on divided highways from inventory routes to non-inventory directions. These efforts should substantially reduce the costs and level of effort to update and enhance the ICAT highway network with new data received from the states.

Coalition use of ICAT for project planning continues to evolve, but slowly. Development of demonstration applications of ICAT in collaboration with specific Coalition members, may be the most effective marketing approach.


FINAL PROJECT EXPENDITURES

10-1G: Development of ICAT (Phase I) - $189,063

10-1V: ICAT Delivery System - $14,976

11-1G: ICAT Phase II - $249,988

13-1G: Complete Data Integration and Develop Trip Table for ICAT - $249,919

14B-1G: Build a Permanent Delivery System - $199,991

15-1T:Origin Destination Commodity Flow - $35,007

15-1G: ICAT Maintenance and Updating Add-on - $119,985

16-1D: ICAT Maintenance and Update - $80,000

17-1D: ICAT Data Support - $100,000

 


The I-95 Corridor Coalition Introduces Two New ICAT Websites

The I-95 Corridor Coalition is pleased to announce the availability of two new websites for use by Coalition members and the general public as part of its Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool (ICAT) project.

  • WebCAT is an interactive web-based geographic information system (GIS) that provides on-line access to information on the Coalition region’s highway and rail systems, system performance, and forecasts of future travel demand and conditions in the Coalition region. WebCAT enables users to view and navigate through a map of the entire Coalition region displaying highway and railroad networks, bridges, traffic bottlenecks, locations of fatal highway crashes, etc. Most features can be queried for more detailed information. Users can also view thematic maps showing, for example, current and future traffic volumes, railroad ownership and trackage rights, etc. The library of thematic data will be expanded in response to user demand and as Coalition projects develop additional information. WebCAT can be accessed at http://ags.camsys.com/icat/
  • DataCAT is a repository and download site for the geographic databases and other data files that comprise ICAT. Current data include the ICAT highway and rail networks, ICAT analysis zones and origin-destination trip tables, individual state road networks from which the ICAT highway network was derived, and copies of relevant national databases such as NHPN, NBI, and FARS Specific Coalition project databases will also be made available as they become authorized for public release. Downloads require only a web browser and Internet connection, but the databases are designed for knowledgeable users capable of conducting analyses using their own computers and GIS application software. DataCAT can be accessed at ftp://ftp.camsys.com/clientsupport/ICAT/site/index.htm

Overview of ICAT

For the past several years, the I-95 Corridor Coalition has been sponsoring development of the Integrated Corridor Analysis Tool (ICAT) to assist Coalition members in conducting multi-state transportation planning and operations studies. ICAT is a web-based geographic information system (GIS) that enables users to visualize current transportation infrastructure and traffic patterns, and to project future travel volumes across multiple states within the Coalition region. ICAT is not a replacement for more detailed state and local data, models, or analysis tools. It is intended to supplement local analysis capabilities with objective and consistent information on transportation conditions and performance in neighboring jurisdictions.

ICAT consists of highway and rail networks, and synthesized auto and truck trip tables for the entire Coalition region, containing attribute data gleaned from state and national data sources such as FHWA’s Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) and Freight Analysis Framework (FAF). ICAT fills a gap between state and local transportation network information and national data such as NHPN and the FAF.

ICAT helps member agencies look beyond their own jurisdictional boundaries to facilitate decision-making with respect to public investments in the region’s transportation system. Issues such as regional transportation growth, locations of regional transportation bottlenecks, coordination of multi-state evacuation plans, and the impacts of regional transportation investments can now be more thoroughly evaluated through the use of ICAT data and web-based GIS.